The Radford University Forensic Science Institute (RUFSI) is an interdisciplinary institute whose goal is to promote and support forensic science education, research, and public service. The institute faculty are comprised of specialists in Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Archaeology.  The FSI mission is to serve as a center for innovative interdisciplinary forensic science research and to provide, with integrity, the highest quality educational training, consultation, and public service in the forensic sciences.  Its faculty also provide objective and unbiased court testimony in regard to medicolegal death cases in the Commonwealth and beyond. Learn more.

Science Daily: Forensic News

  • Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA with blood test during pregnancy

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Down syndrome is the most common birth defect, occurring once in every 700 births. However, traditional noninvasive prenatal tests for the condition are unreliable or carry risks for the mother and fetus. Now, researchers have developed a sensitive new biosensor that could someday be used to detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women's blood.

  • Serious problems with forensic software

    New research finds significant flaws in recently released forensic software designed to assess the age of individuals based on their skeletal remains. The researchers report that, on average, the software's age estimates are off by more than 14 years.

  • Levitating particles could lift nuclear detective work

    Laser-based 'optical tweezers' could levitate uranium and plutonium particles, thus allowing the measurement of nuclear recoil during radioactive decay. This technique provides a new method for conducting the radioactive particle analysis essential to nuclear forensics

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News and Upcoming Events

  • Dr. Cliff Boyd was recently honored for his 30 years of outstanding contributions in Archaeology at the    Annual Uplands Archaeology in the East Symposium XII held at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, Feb. 24 – 26, 2017.
  • Research entitled “Comparability of Macroscopic, Microscopic, and Radiologically Defined Pediatric Antemortem Healing Stages” (by Drs. C. Boyd, D. Boyd, S. Roller, D. Foley) received the Ellis R. Kerley award for Outstanding Research in Forensic Anthropology at the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences for 2016-2017.
  • Dr. Donna Boyd was recently selected as Secretary of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology as well as the American Standards Board, Anthropology Group, of the American Academy of Forensic Anthropology.

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