Academic Programs

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Learn more about Claire Percoco, an anthropological sciences student, and why she made Radford University her choice.

Courses in Anthropological Sciences reflect the four major subfields of the discipline: cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology and biological anthropology. Majors are given basic training in all of these areas, with additional specialization available through elective coursework. The Program features concentrations in Archaeology, Forensic Anthropology, Bioarchaeology and General Anthropology. Please see the course catalog for the Core Curriculum requirements and the specific requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degree. Students need a minimum of 120 credit hours to graduate.

REQUIRED CLASSES  (23 credits)

·         ANSC 106 – Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

·         ANSC 201 - Introduction to Anthropological Research

·         ANSC 301 - Principles of Archaeology

·         ANSC 302 - Principles of Biological Anthropology

·         ANSC 303 - Quantitative and Computer Methods in Anthropology

·         ANSC 400 - Senior Seminar

·         ANSC 401 - Anthropological Theory

CONCENTRATIONS

Majors must choose one of the three concentrations outlined below:

General Anthropology Concentration (21 credits)

The General Anthropology Concentration is designed for students who wish for a broader foundation in anthropology. Students are encouraged to take a variety of anthropology coursework in order to build an interdisciplinary understanding of the field. In addition to the Required Anthropological Sciences courses listed above, students in the General Anthropological Concentration must complete the following:

1 Archaeology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 103 - Ancient Worlds of the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inka

·         ANSC 321 - Archaeological Field and Lab Methods

·         ANSC 333 – Old World Prehistory

·         ANSC 361 - Human Impacts on the Prehistoric Environment

·         ANSC 371- Weirding Archaeology: Exploring the Popular Perception of Archaeology

·         ANSC 415- Anthropology of Death

·         ANSC 433- The Ancient & Living Maya: Anthropological Perspectives on Maya Culture

·         ANSC 493 - Field School in Archaeology

AND

1 Cultural Anthropology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 305- Principles of Ethnography

·         RELN 313- Religion and Culture

·         ANSC 105- Native North America

·         ANSC 205 – Sociolinguistics

·         ANSC 415- Anthropology of Death

AND

1 Biological Anthropology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 210 - Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 

·         ANSC 310- Human Skeletal Biology

·         ANSC 320 - Human Osteology

·         ANSC 330 - Primatology or BIOL 330 - Primatology

·         ANSC 410 - Paleoanthropology

·         ANSC 420 - Advanced Forensic Anthropology 

·         ANSC 430 - Bioarchaeology

AND

12 additional credit hours from any ANSC- prefix course.

Forensic Anthropology Concentration (23 credits)

Students interested in specializing in Forensic Anthropology have the option of choosing a Forensic Anthropology Concentration. This preprofessional concentration prepares students for graduate-level study of recent unidentified human remains in a medicolegal context. In addition to the Required Anthropological Sciences Courses listed above, students in the Forensic Anthropology Concentration must complete the following:

ANSC 210 - Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 

ANSC 320 - Human Osteology

ANSC 420 - Advanced Forensic Anthropology 

AND

1 Archaeology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 103 - Ancient Worlds of the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inka

·         ANSC 321 - Archaeological Field and Lab Methods

·         ANSC 333 – Old World Prehistory

·         ANSC 361 - Human Impacts on the Prehistoric Environment

·         ANSC 371- Weirding Archaeology: Exploring the Popular Perception of Archaeology

·         ANSC 415- Anthropology of Death

·         ANSC 433- The Ancient & Living Maya: Anthropological Perspectives on Maya Culture

·         ANSC 493 - Field School in Archaeology

1 Cultural Anthropology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 305- Principles of Ethnography

·         RELN 313- Religion and Culture

·         ANSC 105- Native North America

·         ANSC 205 – Sociolinguistics

·         ANSC 415- Anthropology of Death

AND

6 additional credit hours from any ANSC-prefix course.

Archaeology Concentration (21 credits)

Students interested in a career in archaeology have the option of choosing the Archaeology concentration. This concentration will prepare students for a career as an archaeologist by giving them training in both archaeological field and lab techniques but also on an archaeological culture area in addition to their general training in anthropology. In addition to the Required Anthropological Sciences Courses listed above, students in the Archaeology Concentration must complete the following:

ANSC 321 - Archaeological Field and Lab Methods

AND

ANSC 103 (Ancient Worlds of the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inka),
or ANSC 333 (Old World Prehistory),
or ANSC 433 (The Ancient & Living Maya: Anthropological Perspectives on Maya Culture)

AND

1 Cultural Anthropology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 305- Principles of Ethnography

·         RELN 313- Religion and Culture

·         ANSC 105- Native North America

·         ANSC 205 – Sociolinguistics

·         ANSC 415- Anthropology of Death

AND

1 Biological Anthropology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 210 - Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 

·         ANSC 310- Human Skeletal Biology

·         ANSC 320 - Human Osteology

·         ANSC 330 - Primatology or BIOL 330 - Primatology

·         ANSC 410 - Paleoanthropology

·         ANSC 420 - Advanced Forensic Anthropology 

·         ANSC 430 - Bioarchaeology

AND

6 additional credit hours from any ANSC-prefix course.

 

Bioarchaeology Concentration (21 credits)

Students interested in learning about culture and past societies from human skeletal remains can take the Bioarchaeology concentration.  In this course of study students will learn about human skeletal analysis, an archaeological culture area and what we can learn about an individual and their culture from a burial.

In addition to the required classes listed above students in this concentration will take:

ANSC 430 - Bioarchaeology

ANSC 415- Anthropology of Death

ANSC 310-(Human Skeletal Biology) or ANSC 320 (Human Osteology)

ANSC 103 (Ancient Worlds of the Maya, the Aztec, and the Inka),
or ANSC 321 (Archaeological Field and Lab Methods),
or ANSC 333 (Old World Prehistory),
or ANSC 433 (The Ancient & Living Maya: Anthropological Perspectives on Maya Culture)

AND

1 Cultural Anthropology course from the following list:

·         ANSC 305- Principles of Ethnography

·         RELN 313- Religion and Culture

·         ANSC 105- Native North America

·         ANSC 205 – Sociolinguistics

·         ANSC 415- Anthropology of Death

AND

9 additional credit hours from any ANSC-prefix  course.

Minors housed in the Department of Anthropological Sciences:

Anthropological Sciences

Culture Studies

Archaeology and Prehistory