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FAQ About Academic Advising

The questions listed below are ones that students frequently ask. Just click on the specific question to see the answer. We hope this will help you get those "quick questions" answered while providing guidance as you meet with your academic advisor, plan your program of studies, and think about life goals.

You can always find out who your specific academic advisor is by looking at your degree works on the web--your advisor's name is included in the heading information. The information below will provide information on how advisor assignements are made in the College of Education and Human Development.

Athletic Training

  • All freshmen are advised by Lauren Thomas in the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support.
  • Sophomores with a last name beginning with A-L are advised by Dr. Michael Moore.
  • Sophomores with a last name beginning with M-Z and all juniors and seniors are advised by Dr. Angela Mickle.

Corporate and Commercial Fitness

  • All students are advised by Dr. Jerry Beasley.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing

  • All students are advised by Ms. Ellen Austin.

Early childhood Education/Early Childhood Special Education

  • All students are assigned faculty advisors.

Elementary Education

  • Freshmen and students with less than a 2.75 GPA are advised in the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support
  • Sophomores-seniors with 2.75/3.00 GPA or better are assigned to faculty advisors.

Exercise and Sport Studies

  • All students are advised by Mr. Donnie Tickle

Fitness, Strength, and Conditioning

  • All freshmen are advised by Lauren Thomas in the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with A-L are advised by Dr. Jerry Beasley
  • All other students with a last name beginning with M-Z are advised by Mr. Donnie Tickle.

Health Education and Health Promotion

  • All freshmen are advised by Lauren Thomas in the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support.
  • All other students are advised by Dr. Melissa Grim.

Nutrition and Dietetics

  • All students are advised by Dr. Anne Alexander and Ms. Mary Jean Miller.

Physical and Health Education (teaching)

  • All freshmen are advised by Lauren Thomas in the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with A-H are advised by Susan Miller.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with I-N are advised by Dr. Anna Devito.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with N-Z are advised by Dr. Jon Poole.

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism: Outdoor Recreation

  • All students are assigned to Dr. Mark Wagstaff.

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism: Recreation Therapy

  • All students are assigned to Dr. Jim Newman.

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism: Tourism and Special Events/Tourism and Recreation Management

  • All students are advised by Dr. Teresa O'Bannon.

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism: Undecided/dual Concentration

  • All students are advised by Dr. Ed Udd.

Special Education -- General Curriculum

  • All students are assigned faculty advisors.

Sport Administraton

  • All freshmen are advised by Lauren Thomas in the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with A-H are advised by Dr. Monica Pazmino-Cevallos
  • All other students with a last name beginning with I-N are advised by Dr. Bill Zuti.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with O-Z are advised by Dr. Kevin Ayers.

Sports Medicine

  • All freshmen are advised by Lauren Thomas in the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with A-G are advised by Dr. Laura Newsome.
  • All other students with a last name beginning with H-O are advised by Dr. Kathleen Poole.
  • All other Students with a last name beginning with P-Z are advised by Dr. David Salee.

The Advising Center's academic advisors are always available to work with any student.

If the guidelines above guide a student to receive advising from the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support, please follow the instructions to schedule an appointment.

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Academic advising is a shared responsibility. Both the advisee and the advisor have responsibilities. The better prepared you are for the advising session, the more information you will get to cover with your advisor. Therefore, the advising session is as much your responsibility as it is the advisor's. It is in you best interest to be as prepared as much as possible. Come prepared with a written list of questions. notes from previous advising sessions, and any kind of documentation that you feel is appropriate. If you are still working on the core curriculum requirements, bring a printout of acceptable coure curriculum courses so you and your advisor can talk about which courses are most approrpiate for you based on your academic and career plans. Print the latest version of your degree audit from the Student Information System bring that also. You should have your own copy of your progress sheet that you update regularly so you know which requirements you have already completed, which ones you are currently completing, and what remains to be completed. Keep all of your advising materials in a folder. That way you know where all of your paperwork is and it's easy to get your hands on before your appointment.

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The first thing you should do is approach the professor of the course. The profesors here at Radford University are wonderful about taking the time to get to know their students. Do not let a situation escalate to where it is out of control and beyond someone helping you. Make an appointment with the professor immediately to discuss the situation and try to develop a resolution. You will find that your professor wants you to be successful and will offer advice and encouragement for your success. Your professor may give you some ideas on "how to study" for the course or refer you to the Learning Assistance and Resource Center (LARC),  to a tutor from that specific department, to your academic advisor or to form a study group. Your professor is your best resource when you are having dificulties in a course.

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The best thing you can do to prevent this from happening is to be extremely proactive. It is up to you! Talk to the professor, talk with your advisor, use the services provided by the Learning Assistance Resource Center (LARC). If you still end up receiving a poor grade, make an appointment with your advisor. Remember you do have options when you find that your are doing poorly in a course. Two academic policies which may serve you well in this situation are the class withdrawal policy and the repeat policy. Information can be found in the undergraduate catalog [PDF]. You and your academic advisor can develop a plan of action based on your individual situation.

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Definitely. Remember: it is always best to discuss taking any course at another institution with your academic advisor who can help you make appropriate plans based on your program and your progress in your program. We find that students tend to take courses that are going to be used to fulfill coure curriculum requirements rather than major requirements at other institutions and transfer them back to Radford University. Many students take courses at their community college close to home during the summer to get ahead in their program or even to catch up if necessary. There may even be a few courses required for your major that are offered at a community college or other four-year institution close to your home that you could take during the summer. You should always check with your advisor or the Advising Center before you select any courses to take so that we can confirm that it is an acceptable/appropriate course. Even though you can find a class at another institution, it may be that your advisor will recommend that you take the course at Radford University but then may help you to find another course you could take at home during the summer. A list of acceptable courses offered by Virginia's community colleges can be found in the "Transfer Guide." [PDF] You will need to complete a "Transfer Approval" form before taking any course at another institution. This form, when processed through the Advising Center, will confirm that the course will transfer to RU and that it is an acceptable course for your program.

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This is really something you should discuss with your advisor. The College has created a resource for you to help in this process, a "GPA calculator." Once you have keyed in the requested information, it will calculate a GPA based on that information. Remember the "GPA calculator" is only as accurate as the information you enter--follow the directions carefully.

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Assessment requirements for admission to the teacher education program will vary just a little depending on the specific program being pursued. All programs require passing scores on Praxis I and the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment either for admission to the program or enrollment in field experience/s. Most programs also require passing scores on Praxis II. And a few require passing scores on the Reading for Virginia Educators. Details are available on the assessment requirements [PDF] handout.

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Your should study! There are plenty of aids available to help you prepare. Assessment preparation books are available in the Teaching Resources Center (TRC) in Peters Hall. You can also receive guidance, assistance and tutoring at the Learning Assistance and Resource Center (LARC). Remember: it is important to prepare for the assessments before you take them. The assessment is expensive and can get costly if you take it numerous times. You always study before you have finals--this is no different. Study! Start your preparation by learning about the test by using the information available on the websites. You will be glad you did!

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The Core Curriculum helps to ensure that all students are provided with a "solid foundation for lifelong learning." All students at Radford University are required to compete 43-45 hours of the Core Curriculum. The purpose is to provide you a broad based foundation for any degree. Most of the courses also serve as pre-requisites for higher level courses. Students who are pursuing a teacher educaiton program will find that these courses are going to be extremely helpful when you make it into a classroom of your own. All students will find that employers are looking for some similar skills no matter the career path one chooses. Those skills include: oral and written communications. collaboration skills, strong work ethic, dependability, critical thinking skills, risk taking skills, flexibility/adaptability skills, interpersonal skills, analytical skills, research skills, problem-solving skills, and multicultural skills. The Core Curriculum provides the foundation for these skills. Please learn more about core curriculum including the mission, goals for each area, and a complete list of acceptable courses.

The Degree Audit is located in your Student Information System under Degree Works; select Process New/View to view your audit. This audit will show what courses you have taken and will match it up with the program that you are pursuing. It will show what has been completed and what needs to be completed for your program. It also shows your overall GPA, your in-major GPA (may not be accurate depending on program) and your advisor.

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A student may withdraw from a course they feel they are not doing well in and will receive a grade of "W". This grade will show up on the transcripts as "W." The student must obtain a withdrawal form from any advising center or the Registrar's Office. The form must be completed and signed by the student's academic advisor or an advisor in the student's advising center and then all copies need to be returned to the Registrar's Office prior to the withdrawal deadline to receive a "W."  A student may not withdraw from more than five classes during the course of undergraduate studies at Radford University.

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The student needs to complete a Declaration of Major/Minor Form. The form can be obtained from any advising center or the Registrar's Office. The form needs to be turned in to the advising center for which you plan to change your major.

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Students with 26 semester hours will be classified as sophomores, with 56 semester hours as juniors, and with 86 hours as seniors.

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At the faculty member's discretion the letter "I" may be entered on the student's transcript for a course whenever some portion of the required work has not been completed by the end of the semester. A written statement of the requirements for removal of the grade "I" must be signed by the faculty member and student and filed in the office of the chairperson of the department in which the course is taught with a copy submitted to the Registrar's Office along with the faculty member's grade sheet. The grade of "I" will automaticall revert to a grade of "F" if not satisfactorily removed by completing all coursework needed by the last day of classes of next semester (fall or spring) semester.

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Students may have holds placed on their accounts for owing the university money for tuition, fees, fines, etc. All students with past due balances will have further registration blocked. If you attempt to register for a class and find your registration"blocked" please check first and make sure you have paid the university any outstanding balances. You can see if you have holds on your account by using the Student Information System and viewing Academics, selecting Student, Student Records, then View Holds. The holds will be listed by office and the reason for the hold. You will need to contact the specific office to find out what needs to be done to remove the hold. Not only will holds prevent you from registering for classes they will also prevent the Registrar's Office from honoring a transcript request.

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To be considered fultime you need to carry 12-18 credit hours. If you drop below 12 hours, this categorizes you as part-time and can affect your financial aid and other services on campus. You need to consider this before you decide to drop below 12 hours. You may also carry more than 18 hours (overload); this has to be approved by the college dean of your major. The overload forms can be picked up in the advising offices.