MUMBAI

January 2002

 

 

My hotel was one of those on the strip of hotels on the waterfront near the monument called the "Gate of India."  Behind the wall is the street where these hotels begin.  They can be seen in the top right corner of the photo.  

On the left begins the nearest slum, which extends along the waterfront where I am standing taking this photo.  The tons of non-biodegradable plastic crap that you and I through in the trash to be carted off, in all poor countries of the world just mounts up in the environment and destroys everything as here on the waterfront of the Indian Ocean. The crap you and I through away is doing this as well, but out of sight, where future generations will reap the whirlwind of our lack of care for the Earth.

 

 

Here I begin a tour of one of the innumerable slums of Mumbai that I asked my friend Dr. Rashmi Mayur to arrange for me.   Kids play in the street with anything available, as is the case worldwide.

 

 

We enter the tiny passageways that are home to tens of thousands of people.  Kids are very curious at the rare sight of a westerner in their neighborhood.   Tourists don't come here.  To read a basic analysis of tourism and its function in our world, see Chapter 14 of my forthcoming Millennium Dawn.

 

 

On can see the sewage water from the innumerable rooms and shops that people home.  It runs in these open drains in the middle of the tiny slum passageways where kids play and everyone walks.

 

 

Like all water, eventually it forms larger and larger streams, full of sewage and filth, flowing into the bay and the India Ocean where Mumbai is located.

 

 

As on the waterfront near my hotel (above), the mostly non-biodegradable garbage piles up everywhere breeding disease, rats, and early death for many.

 

 

A typical home like many I have seen there and elsewhere in the cities of the Third World.  The entire family lives, sleeps, and cooks, in this room which is their home.   This is the legacy that our global economic system has given to the world.  Close to 60 percent of the world's population live in this kind of poverty.

 

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