Applied Health Physical Therapy 844

AHPT 844:  Neuromuscular Development/ Control I
               
Prerequisite: AHPT 830 or permission of the Department
               
Credit Hours: (4)

Neuromuscular Development/ Control I emphasizes the theoretical and clinical bases for the examination and treatment of patients with neurological impairments. Historical and current theories of CNS function, motor control, motor learning, and motor development will be used as the framework for this learning experience.


Detailed Description of Course

Content:  Neuromuscular Development/ Control I emphasizes the theoretical and clinical basis for the examination and treatment of patients with neurological impairments. Historical and current theories of CNS function, motor control, motor learning, and motor development will be used as the framework for this learning experience. Examination procedures and findings and their implications for therapeutic interventions will be examined as described in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. This course prepares students to participate in their second clinical internship experience.
    


Detailed Description of Conduct of Course

Course content may be delivered by lecture, laboratory learning experiences (e.g., movement analysis), demonstration, small-group cooperative learning, case study analysis/ presentations and student debates.



Goals and Objectives of this Course

Will require students to:

1) Describe the models of disablement and explain their clinical implications; 2)  Demonstrate an understanding of historical and current perspectives of CNS function an analyze their clinical implications; 3) Identify theories of motor control and analyze their clinical implications and limitations;  4) Formulate applications of motor learning and motor learning principles to patient treatments and education; 5) Differentiate theories of motor development; 6)
Explain the validity and reliability of reflex testing and its predictive capabilities; 7) Compare and contrast historical and current perspective on CNS function as described in scientific literature; 8) Describe and analyze the normal gait cycle in relation to functional tasks, kinematics, and kinetics; 9) Identify and analyze common gait deviations, their causes and suggest treatment interventions; 10) Compare and contrast the theories regarding the neural control of gait and their clinical implications ; 11) Examine the role of sensation in motor control and learning; 12) Demonstrate sensory testing and formulate its clinical applications and implications to the neurological patient; 13) Define balance and explain its integrative functions; 14) Contrast anticipatory and reactive balance control mechanisms; 15) Demonstrate balance testing and formulate it clinical application and implications to the neurological patient; 16)
Define tone and analyze traditional testing procedures; 17) Define and analyze the current issues  regarding the relationship between tone and motor control; 18) Describe the characteristics of abnormal movement and identify pathological reflexes and patterns; 19) Demonstrate tone assessment procedures and formulate their clinical applications and implication to the neurological patient; 20) Define strength and analyze traditional testing procedures; 21) Analyze the current issues regarding strength training with patient with neurological impairments; 22) Examine the neurological and physiological  components  of weakness following a neurological injury; 23) Demonstrate strength testing and formulate its clinical application and implications to the neurological patient; 24) Define posture and postural control; 25) Describe the components of postural control; 26) Assess posture and movement during functional activities; 27) Perform a postural control assessment and formulate its clinical applications and implications to the neurological patient; 28) Define perception and examine perceptual issues in motor control and motor learning; 29) Demonstrate visual testing and formulate its clinical applications and implementations to the neurological patient; 30) Define cognition and examine cognitive issues in motor learning and motor control; 31) Demonstrate cognitive screening and formulate their clinical applications and implications to the neurological patient; 32) Identify normal upper extremity control; 33) Analyze abnormal upper extremity control and its clinical and functional implications; 34) Demonstrate upper extremity neuromotor development and sensory integration assessment procedures and explain their clinical applications; 35) Define functional mobility; 36) Demonstrate functional mobility testing as applied to various patient types; 37) Determine and analyze the application and limitations of functional mobility testing; 38) Analyze and compare and contrast current and historical literature related to the usage, validity, and reliability of the following examinations areas: functional mobility assessments, tone, balance and posture, strength, motor control, gait, ROM, sensation, perception, and cognition; 39)  Examine the concept of neuro plasticity and analyze it implications in the assessment and treatment of patient with neurological disorders; 40) Analyze the applications and limitations of each neurological testing procedure related to current literature, patient needs, and students’ experiences examining patients; 41) Establish and implement a comprehensive patient management plan of care for a neurologically impaired patient and have it assessed by fellow student or physical therapist; 42) Utilizing current and historical literature, document valid and reliable examination techniques used to assess the following: sensation, perception, cognition, posture, ROM, strength, tone, functional, balance, motor control, gait, ambulation, and mobility; 43) Formulate and demonstrate a comprehensive neurological examination.



Assessment Measures

May include but not limited to:

Examinations, development of an  intervention protocols, Student  projects, student debates, and laboratory practical examinations


Other Course Information

None


Review and Approval


February 10, 2014