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Theatre 327

THEA 327: Acting II: Scene Study

Prerequisites: THEA 227

Credit Hours: (3) Four hours laboratory

Acting II continues the rigorous study of the art of acting which employs practices pursued in Acting I and continues an exploration of technique based in method and nonmethod approaches. This course examines the in-depth process of developing scripted scenes.

Note(s): Acting II is designed for theatre majors. Student cannot receive credit for both THEA 225 and THEA 327.

 

Detailed Description of Content of Course

1. Exploration pursuing the believability of scripted characters found in both dramatic and comedic scenes using several method and non-method approaches.

2. Exploration of full-length play script/character analysis including extensive research and preparation.

3. Exploration of techniques involved with healthy vocal production and its role in clear communication.

4. Exploration of techniques involved with clear communication of the physical body.

5. Written and oral responses to class experiences/self reflection, play readings, live performances, texts, and current periodicals.

6. Development of the collaborative ensemble and its importance to the individual’s artistic process.

7. Addition of the audience and its role to a scene performance.

 

Detailed Description of Conduct of Course

The course utilizes a workshop/laboratory approach. This format includes physical participation of students. Acting II also offers a structured approach to scene performance which includes multiple performances of a single scene which, after self-discovery and instructor/peer observation and evaluation, students can improve their performance process.

 

Goals and Objectives of the Course

1. Competency in pursuing the believability of scripted characters found in both dramatic and comedic scenes and applying several method and non-method techniques.

2. Thorough and complete script/character analysis and the successful process of transferring this knowledge to a character in a live performance.

3. Vocal and physical freedom which includes identifying and releasing tension and learned habits, as well as making vocal/physical choices appropriate to the character.

4. Written and oral eloquence when responding to personal growth, play readings, live performances, texts, and current periodicals.

5. Clear sense of an ensemble and its importance to the individual’s artistic process.

6. Successful performance of scenes with a live audience.

 

Assessment Measures

Students are graded weekly on written work and given continuous feedback on their in-class exercises and out-of-class rehearsed scenes. Preparation and participation are also regularly assessed.

 

Other Course Information

Students are required to see all university theatre productions during the term they are enrolled in the class.

 

Review and Approval

Revised April, 2009