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Reading 414

EDRD 414: Reading II: Comprehension Instruction and Assessment Practices in Reading

Prerequisites: EDRD 314, EDUC 304 (can be taken concurrently) and admission to Teacher Education Program

Credit Hours: (3)

Designed to teach reading comprehension strategy instruction and developmentally appropriate assessment practices to preservice teachers, the course specifically focuses on approaches to reading instruction, strategies for teaching reading in the content areas, and the administration and use of assessment tools to inform instructional practices in literacy.

Detailed Description of Content of Course

Key topics of study will include:
•    Use of motivational strategies, including fostering an appreciation of a variety of high quality literature (e.g., multicultural children books) to supplement content and materials

•    Effective comprehension strategies such as think alouds and the QAR (Question-Answer Relationship)

•    A specific technology requirement: Using a United Streaming (or alternative) video clip to teach a critical comprehension strategy known as the QAR (Question-Answer Relationship), which supports students in categorizing questions according to where and how to find answers

•    Balanced approaches to reading instruction such as the language experience approach and guided reading

•    Use of reading instructional strategies in content areas

•    Assessment concepts and techniques, including interest and attitude inventories, informal reading inventory, with a focus on multiple indicators of learner progress

•    Use of intervention and individualized strategies based on assessment data

•    Use of evaluation criteria such as readability to determine the appropriateness of children’s books and other instructional materials for literacy, including those that are technology-based

•    Participation in local, state, national, and international professional organizations whose mission is the improvement of literacy.

 
Detailed Description of Conduct of Course

This course is part of the elementary education field experience. Students will be in the schools in the morning. During the course of the semester students will administer an Informal Reading Inventory and use data from the assessment to construct instructional recommendations.  In addition, they will design and deliver grade appropriate reading lessons. The in-class sessions will include lecture, audio-visual presentations, student presentations, guest speakers, role-playing, reaction papers, journals, and applied technology assignments.

Goals and Objectives of the Course

Goals, objectives, and assignments in this class address NCATE Standard 1b: Pedagogical Content Knowledge. Objectives below also include the following standards:

•    The Standards for Reading Professionals as articulated by the International Reading Association (IRA):
•    Standard 1: Foundational Knowledge
•    Standard 2: Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Matierals
•    Standard 3: Assessment
•    Standard 4: Creating a Literate Environment
•    Standard 5: Professional Development
•    The Virginia Department of Education (VDOE PREK-6 Standards)
•    The Virginia Reading Assessment: Elementary and Special Education Teachers Test Blueprint (VRA Standards)
•    2007 Virginia Professional Studies for Special Education, K-12 (8 VAC 20-22190)
•    Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI Standards)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

•    Demonstrate knowledge of psychological, sociological, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction (IRA 1.1; ACEI 2.1; VPS5).

•    Demonstrate knowledge of the major components of reading (phonemic awareness, word identification and phonics, vocabulary and background knowledge, fluency, comprehension strategies, and motivation) and how they are integrated into fluent reading (IRA 1.4; ACEI 2.1; VPS5).

•    Use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, and methods, including technology-based practices, for learners at differing stages of development and from differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds (IRA 2.2).

•    Use a wide range of curriculum materials in effective reading instruction for learners at different stages of reading and writing development and from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds (IRA 2.3; VPS5).

•    Use a wide range of assessment tools and practices that range from individual and group standardized tests to individual and group informal classroom assessment strategies, including technology-based assessment tools (IRA 3.1; VRA 0001; ACEI 4).

•    Place students along a developmental continuum and identify students' proficiencies and difficulties (IRA 3.2; VRA 0002).

•    Use assessment information to plan, evaluate, and revise effective instruction that meets the needs of all students, including those at different developmental stages and those from differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds (IRA 3.3; VDOE 1.b, 1.g; VRA 0002; ACEI 4).

•    Be proficient in the use of both formal and informal assessment and screening measures for the components of reading: phoneme awareness, letter recognition, decoding, fluency, vocabulary, reading level, and comprehension (VDOE 1.a; VRA 0001; ACEI 4).

•    Effectively communicate results of assessments to specific individuals (students, parents, caregivers, colleagues, administrators, policymakers, policy officials, community, etc.) (IRA 3.4).

•    Use a large supply of books, technology-based information, and nonprint materials representing multiple levels, broad interests, and cultural and linguistic backgrounds (IRA 4.2).

•    Model reading and writing enthusiastically as valued lifelong activities (IRA 4.3).

•    Continue to pursue the development of professional knowledge and dispositions (IRA 5.2).

•    Participate in, initiate, implement, and evaluate professional development programs (IRA 5.4).

•    Understand the development of reading fluency and reading comprehension (VRA 0008; VPS5).

•    Understand reading comprehension strategies for fiction and poetry (VDOE 1.d; VRA 0009; VPS5).

•    Understand reading comprehension strategies for nonfiction (VDOE 1.e, 1.d; VRA 0010; VPS5).

•    Demonstrate the ability to develop comprehension skills in all content areas (VDOE 1.e, 1.d)

Assessment Measures

Alignment of Assessments with competencies listed  in the Virginia Department of Education Program Status Matrix – 2007 Elementary Education PreK-6 (8VAC20-542-110 Virginia General Content):
Endorsement Competencies    Assignments/Assessment
1.Methods:
a. Understanding the needed knowledge, skills, and processes to support learners in achievement of the  Virginia Standards of Learning in English.
    This is assessed by the following assignments where our candidates match Standards of Learning in English to their lesson plans:
(1) Creating and implementing a Critical Comprehension Guide and lesson, based on the QAR (Question-Answer Relationship), using an appropriately selected United Streaming video clip.  

(2) Embedding additional reading comprehension strategies (e.g., connecting, questioning, visualizing, summarizing, synthesizing) into lesson plans for a variety of content areas, including social studies.

2. Knowledge and Skills
  (1). Assessment and diagnostic teaching:
a. Be proficient in the use of both formal and  
informal assessment and screening measures   for  decoding, fluency, vocabulary, reading level, and comprehension.
b. Be proficient in the ability to use diagnostic data  to tailor instruction, for acceleration, intervention,  remediation and flexible skill-level groupings.    These are assessed by our Informal Reading Inventory (IRI/BRI/QRI) where our candidates engage in analysis of word recognition and comprehension, determine students’ reading skills, strengths and limitations, and make responsive instructional recommendations, including selecting relevant texts at appropriate reading levels.

   (3). Reading/Literature
 d. Be proficient in reading comprehension    
 strategies for both fiction and nonfiction text,
 including questioning, predicting, summarizing,  clarifying, and associating the unknown with what is known;
e. Demonstrate the ability to develop
comprehension skills in all content areas.
    These are assessed by our candidates (1) creating and implementing a Critical Comprehension Guide and lesson, based on the QAR (Question-Answer Relationship) and (2) embedding additional reading comprehension strategies (e.g., connecting, questioning, visualizing, summarizing, synthesizing)  into lesson plans for a variety of content areas, including social studies.
   (3). Reading/Literature
g. Understand the importance of promoting
independent reading by selecting fiction and
nonfiction books, at appropriate reading levels.
    This is assessed by our Informal Reading Inventory (IRI/BRI/QRI) where our candidates engage in analysis of word recognition and comprehension, determine students’ reading skills, strengths and limitations, and make responsive instructional recommendations, including selecting relevant texts at appropriate reading levels.

This is also assessed by quizzes that cover the importance of using a variety of reading materials, the different reading levels and the strategies for determining them.
   (5) Technology. The individual shall demonstrate the ability to guide students in their use of technology for both process and product as they work with reading, writing, and research.    This is assessed when students create and implement a critical comprehension guide and lesson, based on the QAR (Question-Answer Relationship), using an appropriately selected United Streaming video clip in their early experience classroom.
Note: These competencies are also assessed later when students are required to pass the Virginia Reading Assessment.
 
Other Course Information

None

 

Review and Approval
February, 1999: Revised
October 2008: Course description and official syllabus revised by Gaston Dembele and reviewed by Jennifer Jones and Mary Smith.