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Faculty

The Governor's School at Radford University prides itself on pairing the very best faculty with the very best of Virginia's high school students. Though the 2015 curriculum in not yet set, below you can read about select prior Governor's School faculty.

Visual and Performing Arts

Dr. Richard Bay

When I teach, I walk a fine line drawn between my practice as an artist and my passions as an art educator.  Until recently I wasn’t aware of how important the combination of these factors are: my skills as a painter; my talent to redefine a moment/idea; my intuitive use of color and line; and, my ability to communicate these pieces as a whole to a broader audience are the reasons I teach the way I do.  The creative dialogue that I take part in every time I stand I front of the blank canvas is carried over to the way I view my students work and revel in their thinking.  Finding and sharing common experiences, giving pupils options for exploration and developing a mutually respected visual language becomes critical to the evolution of their skills.
 
What I love about teaching is I'm afforded insights that help me establish realistic objectives and trust with my students through their interpretations of problems and the artworks they create.  Classroom assignments that indulge my students’ imagination and allow for the translation of the individuals’ experiences offer opportunities for students to learn about their potential through the visual arts.  This can occur in any genre, using a variety of mediums or techniques that encourage students to offer their ideas and experiences to others in our program and myself.  The student’s responses can be driven by a formal lesson or may arise out of the personal need to create.  What is critical is that the response of the individual is found in the definition to the experience, not of it. Remember from adjudication, Risk equals REWARD!

Dr. David Otis Castonguay is professor of music at Radford University. University choirs under him perform throughout the eastern region of the United States. The university choirs also regularly perform with professional orchestras including performances of Beethoven MissaSolemnis, Beethoven 9th Symphony, Brahms EinDeutches Requiem, DurufléRequiem, the Dvorak Te Deum, Orff’sCarminaBurana and Verdi Requiem.

Castonguay has conducted festival choirs throughout the United States and has presented workshops for the American Choral Directors Association and the Music Educators National Conference. Educated at the University of Connecticut and continuing with doctoral studies at the University of Illinois Castonguay held faculty positions at Bemidji State University (Minnesota), the University of Connecticut and Spaulding High School in Barre, Vermont. Castonguay’s choirs have toured Russia, Israel and most of Europe. Castonguay continues to serve as a juror and master class clinician for three international choral competitions: Christmas in Russia held in Ekaterinburg, Russia and the Martinu Festival in Pardubice, Czech Republic and the Cornwall International Male Choir Festival in Truro, United Kingdom. Castonguay returned to Russia in September of 2010 on a U.S. State Department Fulbright and McGlothlen Foundation grant presenting master classes and public concerts with university and professional choirs in the cities of Ryazan, Izhevsk, and Ekaterinburg. Professor Castonguay is also a soloist in recital and oratorio performing annual recitals of art songs. He studied voice and vocal literature in private lessons with distinguished American singers Blake Stern and William Warfield, as well as master classes with international singing stars EllyAmeling, Arleen Auger and Sherrill Milnes. Castonguay has a strong interest in contemporary music. He has premiered works by Milton Babbitt, Ned Rorem and Charles Whittenberg. Castonguay has also been selected to appear as a member of the Robert Shaw Festival Singers. Castonguay performs solo voice recitals and presents master classes in vocal technique, solo vocal literature and song interpretation.

Dr. Robert Glarner is currently an associate professor of music theory at Radford University. He teaches courses in undergraduate theory, aural skills, and composition. He is also an active organ recitalist and composer. Dr. Glarner has taught at Central Connecticut State University, University of Texas - El Paso, Middlebury College, SUNY-Albany, and Williams College. Dr. Glarner received his Ph.D. in Music Theory from the University of Arizona, a Master's in Theory and Composition from the University of Wyoming, and a Bachelor's of Music in Dalcroze Eurhythmics from the Cleveland Institute of Music.

Humanities

Dr. Ted McKosky retired from Radford University in 2010 after 27 years of teaching. During his time there, he taught radio, sound design and cinema. He served as the coordinator of the cinematic arts component of the Department of Theatre and Cinema.

Dr. McKosky was a presenter/discussant at the Virginia Film Festivals in Charlottesville, Virginia, and created cinema symposiums for Radford University and the New River Valley. He covered all manner of moving-picture-related topics, from Ballyhoo to the Marx Brothers and everything in between. He brings his life-long love of motion pictures, radio, reading and gadgets to play in his teaching, design and free time.

Dr. Paul Thomas, is Associate Professor of Religious Studies in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. In addition to introductory courses in religious studies he teaches courses on Hebrew Bible and New Testament. He earned his interdisciplinary Ph.D. at the University of Missouri-Kansas City where he specialized in religious studies and history while writing a dissertation on giants in the Hebrew Bible. He has taught courses at Radford University on monsters in religion. He knows what hides in your closet.

Dr. Erin Webster-Garrett, a native of Roanoke, Virginia, received her doctorate in literary studies from the University of Denver in 2001. Her dissertation, which was published by Mellen Press in 2007, focuses on Mary Shelley, author of Frankenstein, and Shelley’s struggle as a late Romantic writer to reconcile her professional ambitions with her private roles of daughter, wife and mother. This struggle is one that Dr. Webster-Garrett can relate to in particular as the mother of two precocious children and an aspiring scholar and writer.