Physics Major Faculty Courses Physics/Engineering Dual Degree Astronomy Minor Alumni

Courses

PHYS 111:112. General Physics*. (4:4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequesite: MATH 104 or equivalent.
Vectors, mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, sound, light and selected topics in modern physics.
*Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 111:112 and PHYS 221:222.

PHYS 221:222. Physics.* (4:4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: MATH 151.
Topics of PHYS 111:112 are studies utilizing calculus.
*Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 111:112 and PHYS 221:222.

PHYS 230. Physics of Sound. (3)
Three hours lecture.
A study of wave motion as it relates to sound. Topics include simple harmonic motion, superposition of waves, fundamentals and harmonics, sound quality, power and loudness scales. Applications to human speech and hearing are emphasized.

PHYS 301. Meteorology. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Basic principles of meteorology, including Earth's atmosphere, insulation, humidity, adiabatic processes, large-scale circulation of the atmosphere, mid-latitude weather, violent weather phenomena, and climatology.

PHYS 305. Modern Physics. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or PHYS 222.
Introduction to modern physics, including special relativity, quantum theory, atomic and nuclear physics, elementary particles.

PHYS 306. Intermediate Mechanics. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: PHYS 222 and MATH 152
Study of theoretical and applied Newtonian mechanics including position and velocity dependent forces, osciallations, stability, non-inertial frames and gravitation from extended bodies.

PHYS 308. Electricity and Magnetism. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: PHYS 222 and MATH 152
Study of electric and magnetic fields in free space and in materials, interactions of fields and charges, electromagnetic forces, Gauss' and Faraday's Law and the Maxwell Equations. Building dc, ac, op amp, and transistor circuits, and the use of oscilloscopes, function generators and other electronic test equipment. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 307 (former class) and PHYS 308.

PHYS 308. Electronics Laboratory. (1)
Two hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or PHYS 222
Building dc, ac, op amp, and transistor circuits, and the use of oscilloscopes, function generators and other electronic test equipment. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 307 (former class) and PHYS 309.

PHYS 310. Optics. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or PHYS 222
An intermediate course in geometrical and physical optics. Topics included are mirrors, lenses, interference, diffraction, scattering, polarization, and introductory quantum optics.

PHYS 320. Mechanics. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: PHYS 222
This course is an intermediate treatment of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies.

PHYS 330. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: PHYS 222, or PHYS 112 and MATH 152.
Topics in thermal physics are treated using both classical thermodynamics and statistical methods. Topics include temperature, heat, work, entropy, ideal gases, phase transitions, kinetic theory.

PHYS 406 (GEOL 406). Geophysics. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: either GEOL 101 or ASTR 111, and PHYS 111:112 and MATH 152; or permission of instructor.
Examination of the basic principles and techniques of modern geophysical methods, and the applications of these methods to site investigations for environmental and engineering geologic projects. Some Saturday labs may be required.

PHYS 411 (CHEM 411). Nuclear Chemistry. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 103 or PHYS 112 or 222.
Historical development of modern atomic theory; properties of atomic nuclei; generalizations related to atomic nuclei; types of nuclear reactions; mathematics of radioactive decay processes; nuclear counters; biological effects of radiation; applications of nuclear reactions, radioisotopes, and particle accelerators.

PHYS 421. Electricty and Magnetism I. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: PHYS 222.
The fundamentals of electromagnetic theory are presented at an advanced level. Topics covered are electrostatics, electric current, magnetic fields, the Maxwell Equations, and electromagnetic radiation. The laboratory component of the course includes electrical measurements, electric circuits, and basic electronics.

PHYS 422. Electricity and Magnetism II. (3)
Three hours lecture
Prerequisite: PHYS 421.
Continuation of the topics electromagnetic theory presented in PHYS 421. Topics covered are physical applications of Maxwell's equations, electrodynamics, electromagnetic forces, boundary-value problems, and solution techniques. The laboratory component of the course includes electromagnetic circuits, electromagnetic waves, antenna design, and more advanced electronics.

PHYS 430. Quantum Mechanics. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: MATH 154, PHYS 112 or 222, and PHYS 410.
An introduction to nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Topics included are the Schr´┐Żdinger equation, bound states, angular momentum, spin, scattering theory, and the matrix formulation.

PHYS (CHEM) 441:442. Electronics for Scientists (3:3)
Two hours lecture; four hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 102; PHYS 112 or PHYS 222; MATH 152 or MATH 161
Introduction to analog and digital circuit design appropriate for scientific disciplines.

PHYS 450. Selected Topics in Physics. (1-4)
Minimum of 60 contact hours per semester.
Prerequisites: PHYS 112 or PHYS 222 and MATH 154.
Selected topics in advanced undergraduate physics. A specific course syllabus will be available when the course is offered. A student may take this course for credit more than once provided the topic is different each time.
(Topics offered under PHYS 450 include semester-long studies of quantum mechanics, astrophysics, and geophysics.

PHYS 481,482. Undergraduate Research. (1-3)
Minimum of 15-45 contact hours per semester.
Prerequisites: PHYS 222 and Junior standing.
A laboratory course designed for students wishing to pursue an independent research project.

PHYS 488. Senior Thesis (2-3)
Minimum of 15-45 contact hours per semester.
Prerequisites: Senior standing.
A research course designed for students wishing to prepare a thesis. If a student is enrolled in the Honors Program and has a minimum 3.5 GPA in all courses and in Physics, this may become their Senior Honors Thesis so long as their final thesis grade is an "A" or a "B.". This course may not be repeated.

PHYS 498. Independent Study. (1-6)
The student, under the supervision of a faculty member, will study independently an area of physics, or a special topic in physics. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.



ASTR 111. General Astronomy I. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: none.
Survey of astronomy from ancient cultures to present day, nature of light and gravity, telescopes and astronomical observations, evolution and dynamics of Earth and our solar system.

ASTR 112. General Astronomy II. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: none. ASTR 111 is not a prerequisite for ASTR 112.
Stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, the universe beyond the solar system and the cosmic distance ladder, black holes and other exotic objects, galaxies, origin and evolution of our universe.

ASTR 310. Observational Methods in Astronomy. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: ASTR 112, MATH 152, PHYS 112 or 222 (or permission of instructor).
Students will make telescopic observations of the moon, planets, stars, interstellar medium, and galaxies. Topics will include theory and practice in optical-range astrophotography and digital imaging techniques, and astronomical data reduction and interpretation.

ASTR 421. Solar System Astronomy. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: ASTR 111:112; PHYS 112 or 222.
Application of astronomical concepts and techniques to solid astronomical bodies; study of meteorites, impact craters and ring systems; basic orbital mechanics.

ASTR 422. Galactic Astronomy and Cosmology. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisite: ASTR 111:112; PHYS 112 or 222.
Application of astronomical concepts and techniques to the structure and evolution of galaxies and other large-scale structures; cosmology including the origin and evolution of our universe.



PHSC 301. Meteorology. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Basic principles of meteorology, including Earth's atmosphere, insulation, humidity, adiabatic processes, large-scale circulation of the atmosphere, mid-latitude weather, violent weather phenomena, and climatology.

PHSC 350. Physical Science. (4)
Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: General Education science sequence.
An analysis and synthesis of physical systems.

PHSC 402. Methods of Science Teaching. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and a major in one or more of the sciences.
This course is designed to facilitate the preparation of secondary science teachers. Students will examine and utilize various instructional strategies for teaching science in grades 9-12.

PHSC 431. Energy and the Environment. (3)
Three hours lecture.
Prerequisites: PHYS 112 or PHYS 222 or PHSC 122 or CHEM 102.
A study of energy, its many forms and uses, how it is converted from one form to another, and the environmental consequences of those conversions.

PHSC 488H. Final Honors Thesis. (2-3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the physical science General Education requirements, enrollment in the Honors Academy, completion of all other Honors Academy requirements, a minimum 3.5 GPA in all courses and in physical science, senior standing.
To earn a bachelor's degree in physical science a student must conduct research and write a thesis. In order to receive honors credit, a student must earn a grade of "A" or "B" for the final thesis. Course may not be repeated.

PHSC 490. Internship. (1)
Prerequisites: PHYS 111:112 or PHYS 221:222 or ASTR 111:112 or CHEM 101:102, six hours of required courses in the Physical Science major at the 300 level or above, and departmental approval.
Application of skills and techniques learned in the classroom to real life situations. Participating students submit a program proposal to the sponsoring agency and supervising instructor. Agency may pay student for work performed. This course will be graded P/F. Students may repeat this course for a maximum of 3 credits.