The Radford University Forensic Science Institute (RUFSI) is an interdisciplinary institute whose goal is to promote and support forensic science education, research, and public service. The institute faculty are comprised of specialists in Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Archaeology.  The FSI mission is to serve as a center for innovative interdisciplinary forensic science research and to provide, with integrity, the highest quality educational training, consultation, and public service in the forensic sciences.  Its faculty also provide objective and unbiased court testimony in regard to medicolegal death cases in the Commonwealth and beyond. Learn more.

Science Daily: Forensic News

  • Into the wild for plant genetics

    A new article reveals the opportunities for portable, real-time DNA sequencing in plant identification and naming. Using a handheld DNA sequencing device they conducted the first genomic plant sequencing in the field at a fraction of the speed of traditional methods, offering exciting possibilities to conservationists and scientists the world over.

  • Automated fingerprint analysis is one step closer to reality

    The first big case involving fingerprint evidence in the United States was the murder trial of Thomas Jennings in Chicago in 1911. Jennings had broken into a home in the middle of the night and, when discovered by the homeowner, shot the man dead. He was convicted based on fingerprints left at the crime scene, and for most of the next century, fingerprints were considered, both in the courts and in the public imagination, to be all but infallible as a method of identification.

  • Oral bacteria may help forensic scientists estimate time since death

    Accurately determining the time since death is an important aspect of forensic sciences and casework.

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News and Upcoming Events

  • Dr. Cliff Boyd was recently honored for his 30 years of outstanding contributions in Archaeology at the    Annual Uplands Archaeology in the East Symposium XII held at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, Feb. 24 – 26, 2017.
  • Research entitled “Comparability of Macroscopic, Microscopic, and Radiologically Defined Pediatric Antemortem Healing Stages” (by Drs. C. Boyd, D. Boyd, S. Roller, D. Foley) received the Ellis R. Kerley award for Outstanding Research in Forensic Anthropology at the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences for 2016-2017.
  • Dr. Donna Boyd was recently selected as Secretary of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology as well as the American Standards Board, Anthropology Group, of the American Academy of Forensic Anthropology.

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