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Humanities (Required 3 Hours)

Course Number     Course Title   
Course Description
CLSS 110 Classical Mythology Three hours lecture. Study of Greek and Roman mythology, the role of mythology in classical antiquity, and the influence of classical mythology upon Western culture.
ENGL 200 Literary Texts and Contexts Three hours lecture. Study of selected works of literature with an emphasis on developing 1) critical reading skills within historical, cultural, national, and ideological contexts and 2) an understanding of the various ways of reading and writing about human experience.
HIST 101 World History to 1500 Three hours lecture. A general survey of world history; a study of the world’s major cultural areas, their unique achievements and their interaction with and relation to other societies. Covers the period after mid-17th century.
HIST 102 World History since 1500 Three hours lecture. A general survey of world history; a study of the world’s major cultural areas, their unique achievements and their interaction with and relation to other societies. Covers the period after mid-17th century.
HIST 111 U.S. History to 1865 Three hours lecture. Survey of national history from the colonial period through the American Revolution and early national period through the Civil War. Emphasis on economic, political and social developments and the growth of the representative and democratic process.
HIST 112 U.S. History since 1865 Three hours lecture. General survey of national history since the Civil War. Explores economic, political and social developments in the United States and growing American involvement in world affairs.
PHIL 111 Knowledge, Reality & the Human
Condition
Three hours lecture. Introduces students to philosophy through an examination of fundamental questions about the nature of reality, the possibility of knowledge, and the human search for meaning. By reading and discussing the work of several major philosophers, students learn to engage in careful and critical reflection on their own lives and on what it means to be a human being.
PHIL 112 Ethics and Society Three hours lecture. Introduces students to philosophy through the study of ethics. Readings from major focus questions about value in human life and actions. Topics covered may include the nature of ethical reasoning and moral obligation, the value of morality to the individual and society, how ethics helps us understand our place in the universe, and how ethical ideas clarify moral problems facing society.
PHIL 114 The Origins of Western Philosophy Three hours lecture. Introduces students to philosophy by tracing the development of the discipline from its origin in ancient Greece to the deadline of the ancient world in the 4th and 5th centuries CE. Through an examination of the work of such thinkers as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, students learn to engage in careful and critical reflection on both the human and the natural world and to experience the sense of wonder that animates the discipline of
philosophy.
POSC 110 Introduction to Politics
Three hours lecture. Introduces students to the concepts and methods of political science by examining enduring questions and concerns of political life using political philosophy and literature.
RELN 111 Introduction to Religion Three hours lecture. Presents recurrent forms and issues in religious life, e.g. myths, rituals, the nature of the divine, good and evil, and introduces students to the academic study of religion. Traditions are covered  thematically, with emphasis upon cross cultural features of religion and pertinent theories.
RELN 112 Survey of World Religions Three hours lecture. This introductory course presents the classical expressions of the world's most widespread and historically significant religions. Students will learn about the origins, foundational figures, scriptures, beliefs, and practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
RELN 203 Sacred Texts of the West Three hours lecture. Through critical reading of selections from the Old Testament, the New Testament, and the Qur’an, students will become familiar with the content of these texts; students will engage in the critical interpretation of these sacred texts; and students will be introduced to the methods and theories that support the academic study of sacred texts and narratives. Not limited in historical context and scope, students will be introduced to the social and historical factors that influenced the development
of each canon in its original context as well as examining how religious communities work to ensure the continued relevance of their sacred texts and narratives.
RELN 206 Survey of Religious Experiences Three hours lecture. This is a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary examination of religious experiences, defined as "reported direct encounters with the supernatural." Students will read accounts from around the world of religious visions and calls, possession, mystical union, and journeys to the afterlife, along with the biographies of shamans, mediums, and mystics. Theories from a variety of academic disciplines will illuminate the human causes and consequences of these extraordinary phenomena.