Faculty Associates

Definitions and Expectations of IDSL Faculty Associates and Instructional Faculty Associates

Faculty Associates comprise the pool of faculty who serve as independent study mentors and internship faculty advisors to IDSL students.

Instructional Faculty Associates comprise the pool of faculty to teach courses in the IDSL program including Research Methods in Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST 250) and/or Senior Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST 497). Instructional Faculty Associates (with the exception of adjunct faculty) may also elect to serve as Faculty Associates and be included in the pool of faculty to serve as independent study mentors and internship faculty advisors to IDSL students.

Both Faculty Associates and Instructional Faculty Associates are expected to support the IDSL program and participate in IDSL activities.

Eligibility for appointment as a Faculty Associate

All fulltime T&R and AP faculty in good standing are welcome and invited to apply for status as a Faculty Associate in the IDSL program. Upon application approval (see information below), Faculty Associates will be entered into the pool of faculty to serve as independent study mentors and internship faculty advisors to IDSL students.

Eligibility for appointment as an Instructional Faculty Associate

All fulltime T&R, AP, and adjunct faculty in good standing are welcome and invited to apply for status as an Instructional Faculty Associate in the IDSL program. Upon application approval (see information below), Instructional Faculty Associates will be entered into the pool of faculty to teach courses in the IDST program including Research Methods in Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST 250) and/or Senior Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies (IDST 497).

Application Procedures

For consideration as an IDSL Faculty Associate, individuals should submit:

1.      CV

2.      A brief description (250 word maximum) of research interests—something like a faculty profile—to be included on the website.

3.      A letter of interest detailing experience and/or interest in interdisciplinary work as well as experience and/or interest in mentoring students (500 word maximum).

For consideration as an IDSL Instructional Faculty Associate, individuals should submit:  

1.      CV

2.      A letter of interest discussing experience and/or interest in interdisciplinary work Interdisciplinary and/or relevant courses taught, and a discussion/statement of which IDST courses faculty are interested in teaching (500 word maximum).

3.      A letter from your department chair or director indicating her/his support of your teaching for the IDSL program as well as a statement indicating their ability to cover the course "lost" from your program.   

4.      Summary of quantitative and qualitative teaching evaluations from your FAR from the last 3 years (not to exceed one page).

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

Application Review Procedures and Service Terms

A selection committee, comprised of the 2 social science faculty and the 2 humanities faculty serving on the IDSL Advisory board and the IDSL director, will review faculty applications. The selection committee aims to select a broad pool of Faculty Associates to best serve the needs of IDSL students. Instructional Faculty Associates will be selected based on current program needs.

Both Faculty Associates and Instructional Faculty Associates serve three year terms. Faculty interested in serving multiple terms are encouraged to apply for reappointment in their final year of service.

Current IDSL Faculty Associates

Dr. Brock Cutler (bcutler2@radford.edu) is Assistant Professor of History. He interested in the relationship between the physical environment and the human world. His own research is on the history of the colonial state in nineteenth-century Algeria, with particular focus on periods of environmental disaster. Professor Cutler is able to advise within the following areas: non-US history, environment and environmental theory, the Middle East and North Africa, empire, and social philosophy.

 

Dr. Leslie S. Daniel (ldaniel10@radford.edu) is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the School of Teacher Education and Leadership.  She teaches in the licensure area of Special Education:  Adapted and General curriculum.  This is an interdisciplinary studies major leading to teaching licensure.  Dr. Daniel is also creator and coordinator for RU's Certificate of Autism Studies.  Her classes are taken by special, elementary, and middle educations; heath and human performance; communication and science disorders; and psychology undergraduate and graduate students.  Dr. Daniel's teaching and research interests include autism, classroom management, positive behavior supports, and co-teaching.

 

Dr. Sandra French (sfrench5@radford.edu) is Associate Professor of Communication. She currently serves as Associate Editor for the Journal of Business Communication. Her teaching and research interests include organizational communication; business rhetoric; corporate reputation management; leadership.



 

Dr. Joanna Hunter (junter35@radford.edu) is Assistant Professor of Sociology, joining the department at Radford in the fall of 2013. Her  scholarly work focuses on situated identity practices and deals with the intersection of individual identity and organizational identity.  Her most recent article, “It's Not Written On Their Skin Like it is Ours:  Greek Letter Organizations in the Age of the Multicultural Imperative” appears in the October 2013 issue of Ethnicities.  She is currently working on a project about religious identity among American college students and a project about non-Black members of historically Black fraternities and sororities.  In addition to teaching the required Research Methods course in the IDSL program, she teaches courses in social psychology, gender and deviance. 

 

Dr. Mary LaLone (mlalone@radford.edu) is a Professor of Anthropology, who teaches in the RU Department of Sociology.  In addition to teaching and publishing in the fields of applied sociology and cultural anthropology, her training and work experiences span the fields of Museum Studies, Library Science, Environmental Studies, and Ethnohistory.  She has more than 20-year's experience developing university-community partnerships engaging RU students in community-based research to help preserve the cultural heritage of community groups in Southwest Virginia (see https://mlalone.asp.radford.edu/Home/html).  Together with her students, she has written numerous consulting reports for community organizations and published three books of oral histories preserving Southwest Virginia's coal mining, farming, and Arsenal history.  Dr. LaLone received Radford University's Donald N. Dedmon Professional Award for Teaching Excellence.  Professor LaLone is able to advise in the following research areas:  cultural anthropology, Appalachian studies, oral history, museum studies, and community-based research.

 

Dr. John Liptak (jjliptak@radford.edu) is Associate Director in Career Services. He is the author of  numerous assessments, books and  workbooks in the area of career exploration and development.  Dr. Liptak has taught in the area of career development, social science, and counselor education. He also brings experience from working as a forensic mental health counselor for both the state prison system in Delaware and the Federal Bureau of Prisons.  His research interests include entrepreneurship, social problems, deviance, gender issues, mental health, and career development. 

 

Dr. Jeanne Mekolichick (jmekolic@radford.edu) is Professor of Sociology. She has taught widely in the field of Sociology, focusing recently in the areas of community-based research, applied sociology, and transition to career. Her most recent research focuses on understanding the impact of undergraduate research on students.

 

Dr. Paul Thomas (pthomas15@radford.edu) is Associate Professor of Religious Studies in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. His areas of expertise include Biblical Studies and monsters in religious traditions. In 2006 Dr. Thomas earned his Ph.D. from an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City in the disciplines of religious studies and history. His interdisciplinary dissertation combined a morphological (study of forms) and historical method in a comparative study of giants in the Hebrew Bible. Dr. Thomas’ current research explores the reception of the Bible in material objects using methods developed in the disciplines of history, English and literary studies, and cultural studies.

 

Dr. Allison Wisecup (awisecup@radford.edu) is Assistant Professor of Sociology. Her teaching and research interests include social psychology; self, role, & society; gender, stratification; identity, interaction & emotions; health inequalities; sport and society; mental health.